Monday, August 27, 2012

New Brian V Moore website

Team Building in South Africa, Team Conflict Resolution and Diversity Management Consultant and EFT Therapist,  -  Brian V Moore is often described as a Breyani Mix as he is of Irish, English, Welsh and Scottish ancestry, was born in Northern Rhodesia (Zambia), of South African parents, was raised in Port Shepstone, became a member of a Zulu tribe and married into a South African Indian family.

He has been the catalyst for Celebrating Humanity International - formerly Mthimkhulu International - and focuses on building respect, accountability and unity within diverse teams, removing conflict within teams, diversity management training and transformational team building.

He and Arthie have created the Dream Dynasty programme - to put the dream back into education and the Legacies Africa campaign.

Together they have created the Team Building in South Africa and the Diversity Training in South Africa websites.

He now has a new website. Connect here with Brian V Moore.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

French and South African Management Styles - a comparison

French and South African Management Styles - a comparison 

By Brian Moore - 24 May 2012.

We recently had the opportunity to work with a French-owned company in South Africa. As usual there were a number of diversities in the management team - this included a young French manager, a number of Afrikaans managers, English-speaking South African managers, a Hindu South African manager. Two were female and the balance male.

As in most diverse South African teams there were the normal challenges - personality types, communication styles, work styles, culture, gender,education, experience and belief systems. Added to this was the French dynamic.

There is a huge variation in the management styles in South Africa, all affected by the South African diversities. And there is a far bigger divide between South African and French Management Styles. When added to the lack of understanding of cultural differences and etiquette - it can be quite challenging.

In South Africa

At the end of this brief comparison

International Perspectives on French Management Styles.

1)    French Management Style 
Most senior management in most French companies were educated at the Grandes Ecoles which are the elite schools of France. These colleges champion an intellectual rigour in their students, which is rarely matched elsewhere in the world. This produces a highly educated management population, which approaches leadership with an unusual degree of academic precision. 'Intellectualism' is something to be cherished rather than sneered at and a comment once attributed to French management was that 'this idea seems alright in practice but will it work in theory?'
Thus, management is an intellectual task to be mastered and thought about in terms of detailed analysis, the complete mastery of complex concepts and information and the eventual application of rational decisions. More pragmatic issues of buy-in, motivating staff etc. (in the Anglo-Saxon understanding of these terms) are not as prominent in French management thinking.
Decisions, once taken at senior levels, will be passed down the chain to lower management for implementation. This directive approach can be seen, especially by those from a consensus oriented, non-hierarchical background, as being overly authoritative and lacking in the necessary team-building elements

2)    Being a Manager in France 
The business set up in France is egalitarian and to ensure successful cross cultural management it is important to remember to treat each and every person with equal respect and deference.
In other words, in business it is safest to be formal and reserved in your behavior and expect that your French colleagues will be the same. Communication may be both formal and informal, depending upon the person you are dealing with and the relationship between you.
The Role of a Manager
French business behavior emphasizes courtesy and a degree of formality. Chief executives of French companies often come from a select group of universities and share a similar background. Consequently, it is best to send a senior executive to initiate the relationship with the French decision-maker, especially if it is someone whose credentials and experience are comparable.
Newcomers to the French management style should carefully study the corporate culture of specific companies because they may vary. Consequently, employees will range from feeling empowered to speak out in the management process, to those who believe it is most important to simply execute the instructions by their leadership.
Approach to Change
France’s intercultural adaptability and readiness for change is developing all the time. France is seen to have a medium tolerance for change and risk. It is important for innovations to have a track record or history noting the benefits if they are to be accepted and implemented.
The fear of exposure, and the potential of embarrassment that may accompany failure, brings about aversion to risk and the need to thoroughly examine the potential negative implications. While in risk-tolerant environments, failure is perceived as a learning process that encourages confidence in future ventures, failure in France causes a long-term loss of confidence by the individual as well as by others. Because of this attitude, intercultural sensitivity is going to be required, especially when conducting group meetings and discussing contributions made my participating individuals.
Approach to Time and Priorities
France is a controlled-time culture, and adherence to schedules is important and expected. In France missing a deadline is a sign of poor management and inefficiency, and will shake people’s confidence. People in controlled-time cultures tend to have their time highly scheduled, and it’s generally a good idea to provide and adhere to performance milestones.
Effective cross cultural management skill will depend on the individual’s ability to meet deadlines.
Decision Making
For effective cross cultural management it is important to remember that hierarchy is part of the French business culture. This is a country where rank has its privilege, often both literally and figuratively. Decision making is done at the highest levels, often without consultation with subordinates.
Boss or Team Player
French like working in teams and collaborate quite well. The communication within a team is generally quite collegial, albeit somewhat direct and blunt. Role allocation within the team is generally quite clearly defined and people will take greater responsibility for their specific task than for the group as a whole.
Successful cross cultural management will depend on the individual’s ability to harness the talent of the group assembled, and develop any resulting synergies. The leader will be deferred to as the final authority in any decisions that are made, but they do not dominate the discussion or generation of ideas. Praise should be given to the entire group as well as to individuals.
Communication and Negotiation Styles
French business emphasizes courtesy and a fair degree of formality. Wait to be told where to sit as there may be a protocol to be followed. Although English may be spoken, it is a good idea to hire an interpreter so as to avoid any cross cultural misunderstandings. Business is conducted slowly. You will have to be patient and not appear ruffled by the strict adherence to protocol. Avoid confrontational behavior or high-pressure tactics as it can be counterproductive.
The French will carefully analyze every detail of a proposal, regardless of how minute. The French are often impressed with good debating skills that demonstrate an intellectual grasp of the situation and all the ramifications.
Never attempt to be overly friendly. The French generally compartmentalize their business and personal lives.

3)    France: Management Styles
2011-01-02 by
The PDG (President Directeur General) is equivalent to the CEO, and most senior level executives are directeurs. Senior management tends towards a directive, rather than a collaborative style, with the PDG determining overall direction, which is disseminated down the line for implementation by junior management.
The French by nature tend to shy away from risk. Privacy and individual accomplishment of one’s tasks are critical in French business culture; workers provide what their bosses expect of them, and plans, methods and reports can be time-consuming, thorough and complicated efforts toward perfection. All of this occurs in a formal and sometimes very rigid hierarchical structure, which means that time, deadlines and efficiency, while important, are secondary to attention to detail, rigorous logic and perfection of form.
Each individual on a French team prefers to have a very specific task; the team is an organization of different individuals with different objectives and roles, all carefully defined. Thus, French bosses are expected to provide guidance and information and to make decisions, while subordinates provide detailed information and follow the decisions made by the superiors.
Traditionally, French companies have followed a somewhat paternalistic or ‘family’ model, with senior managers making key decisions without necessarily communicating relevant information to subordinates. All in all, communicating information may be a challenge in French organizations and this can prove frustrating to a foreigner who is attempting to understand how and why decisions are made.
Most senior managers were educated at the elite schools (or Grandes Ecoles) of France. This may be the case even in so-called American or multinational  corporations based in France. Intellectualism is something desired in French managers; one’s ability to master complex concepts and provide and understand detailed analysis is respected far greater than one’s interpersonal skills and ability to motivate staff and build effective teams. Complimenting and rewarding employees publicly is not common That being said, managers often have strong relationship

Compiled by Brian V Moore

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Diversity Training Presentation Slide Show and Feedback.

If your really want to transform your diverse teams in truly positive, exciting and powerful ways check out our Diversity Training! (Diversity Training Presentation Slide Show.)

Here is some recent feedback from Beekman Super Canopies.

16 July 2012

As a company we decided to use Celebrating Humanity as our provider for Diversity Training – in the Cape, KZN and Gauteng provinces.  And what a good choice that was.

Arthie and Brian Moore are absolutely amazing people who are able to bring out the best in people.  The manner in which they present the training is really practical and uplifting.  Our 411 employees thoroughly enjoyed the manner in which the interaction took place.  What a pleasure to hear the positive feedback from the employees.  Some wanted to attend the training again!

As a company we found that employees who never really had contact with one another were able to get first-hand information about one another as well as glimpse the world in which they live.

I would recommend Arthie and Brian Moore for any training that involves getting people to understand one another as well as one self.  The positive energy they bring into a room is electrifying and certainly makes all attendees come alive.

This training has really had a positive impact on all our employees and it shows within our company family.  Should a company make use of Celebrating Humanity, there will only be a positive outflow from contact with this amazing provider.

Yours faithfully

Sunday, June 17, 2012

At the level of respect, all people are equal.

What I love most about internet-based forums is the way in which they bring so many diverse people, with differing experience and views together. What challenges me most is the way in which some people see the forums as a place to force their views and positions on others.

Instead of increasing input and bringing in more knowledge seekers, it has the opposite effect of shutting down people who could bring new ideas, or great questions. This diminishes all of us.

Any of us who have been in a training session will know that many people, fearful of embarrassment, or ridicule, will keep quiet. They only discuss issues where they feel safe. 

“It is not the role of the experienced, or angry, to prevent the input or questions of the curious, the knowledgeable, or the inexperienced. It is their role to open the way for questioning, sharing and learning.” (Because of the diversity of  knowledge, tasks and fields - we all are inexperienced in certain areas and experienced in others. And that is ok.)

If we could all stick to the concept, “At the level of respect, all people are equal”, and communicate in a way that brings in more people, we will bring about a better World. If we disagree, let’s do it in a way that increases dialogue.

To those of you who are a little nervous to bring your ideas and questions, please be welcome here. 

Your input is as important as anyone else. And remember, “Anything that is said is merely the opinion of a person – no matter how experienced they are, or appear to be.” 

In meetings, encourage input from everyone. Make it safe for all to have their say. Quiet people are often the greatest observers. Without their view of the situation - you are half-blind.

Kind regards

17 June 2012

English – the “common” language?

Another challenge is how we understand words and concepts differently. Many people are not communicating in their mother tongue – when writing - or speaking in English. This can cause confusion to others. It can also cause people to dismiss wonderful inputs, or to take umbrage to what is written. 

Just because we all speak English – does not make it a common language!

The use and meaning of words, in English differ from country to country. Just as a small example, the concept and meaning of the word “diversity” definitely has differing meanings, in my country alone. The differences in concept, across nations, will be even greater. In diversity forums this may be the main stumbling block.

The manner in which people present their ideas also varies. Certain people try and couch their ideas in an almost round-about manner – in order to save the feelings of the people they communicate with. They try to be “diplomatic.” Many people have no idea what they mean. There are others who use sarcasm. To the sarcastic this way of communicating is sharp, tactical and clever. Again there are many people who do not have a clue what they are on about.

Others use the shock tactics of attack and accusation, perhaps thinking that they will bring change and realisations. Often, all that they do is isolate themselves and others. Some will just hurtfully blurt out their judgements and prejudices. Some will learn from that, many will be angered and turn away from them.

Within all of this – even though we use a “common” language, we all need to be constantly vigilant regarding the messages that are being sent out and how we receive them through our preconceptions and judgements.  Are we receiving the messages, as they were intended? Do we need to ask more questions to get true understanding, before we add our judgements?

Steven Covey in the 7 Habits of Highly Successful people wrote, “Seek first to understand and then to be understood.” I personally will try to practice this much more.

Kind regards

17 June 2012

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Dream Dynasty and Diversity Management in Schools.

Please email me for more information. Or call +27 79 643 4457.

Brian V Moore – Managing Director
Celebrating Humanity International
The Dream Dynasty – Focusing on the Dream in Education

Aims of the Dream Dynasty
To build highly-prepared, well-supported, values-based and mentored dream-focused school leavers – who know what they want from life, know to get want they want and are determined to get it.
To create a safe and empowering learning environment in which learners, educators, support team and parents can grow and develop.
Some of the challenges for learners, who live without dreams or a vision.
  School is often something learners just have to do.
  •   Average or below average performance.
  •   They are focused on a “pass.” Anything above a failure will do just fine!
  •   They have low morale; little enthusiasm and commitment.
  •   Absenteeism, disrespect, bad attitudes are the norm.
  •   There is excessive bullying/ vandalism.
  •   Bored learners become fun seekers – often leading to chemical abuse, vandalism and mischief.
Resultant challenges for these school leavers
  •   They have no focus or direction.
  •   They will study anything that comes up. Whatever will keep their parents from complaining.
  •   Have no idea of what they want when job seeking, “Give me a job – any job.”
  •   Find themselves in dead-end jobs. (Something they just have to do, for money.)
  •   They become bored, demoralised and quarrelsome.
  •   The natural joy of life, power and creativity, that many of these young people have - becomes crushed.
We can change all of that, when we focus on their dreams. This brings an amazing and positive energy, that everyone can work with. We can then teach them easy-to-learn relationship, learning skills, negotiation skills that better them - in the pursuit of their dreams.

Together we can do it.

Managing Diverse Teams in Schools
The Celebrating Humanity Way.

Celebrating Humanity International has over 20 years experience in diversity training, team building and team conflict resolution.

The focus of this enjoyable, inclusive, participative, non-threatening and effective team unity building© programme is to develop professionalism, trust, motivation, understanding, communication, relationships, unity, accountability and respect within your client’s team.

Challenges in conflicted diverse teams

1.     Poor inter-team relationships.
2.     Gossiping
3.     Quarrelling/ Back stabbing
4.     Personality and culture clashes.
5.     Bad attitudes.
6.     Poor or no communication.
7.     Racism/ Prejudice
8.     Low morale and commitment.
Resultant challenges for learners in this unstable environment
1.     Bad Educator and Learner attitudes.
2.     Low morale and motivation.
3.     Uncontrolled bullying.
4.     Learner absenteeism.
5.     Below normal performance.
6.     Learners ill-prepared for life
The secret is to lead diversity – not manage it.
In closing
“Put people together in a way that will have them bouncing ideas off each other, befriending each other, and taking care of each other, and suddenly they are coming to you, not with gripes and problems, but with solutions and great ideas.”
- Richard Branson, in his book, Business Stripped Bare 

Brian V Moore

Monday, May 7, 2012

Recent Celebrating Humanity Feedback - Judi Meyer

Feedback from our recent Celebrating Humanity work, near Pretoria...
This 1 day Celebrating Humanity Eye Opener Diversity Training program was facilitated at St Georges Hotel - near Centurion - on 3 May 2012.

Hi Brian and Arthie

I have received very positive feedback from the day we spent with you and as you can imagine this experience has also set my thoughts into a different direction which I would like to share with you.

The main change I am experiencing at the moment is the realisation that we started this company because we felt that the corporate environment we where in was no longer “fun” and that we felt the working environment oppressive in the sense that there was no space for individuals and that each persons efforts and individual value add was not recognised. Unfortunately the challenges we face daily in the business environment and inter personally between the share holders has meant that this is the exact environment we have created!

I have learnt that I need to remember that it really is people who make a business and that we need to create an environment where these people can grow and have fun. That HR is about this and that this is where we now need to focus on this in order for us to create the business we set out to do! This will be my personal challenge and I hope that I will be able to integrate this into our company culture.

More than the content of your workshop I would like to thank you for sharing the “you” that you both are! I think this has had the greatest effect on all of us.

Judi Meyer | Financial Manager and Director
Delphius Commercial and Industrial Technologies

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Nelson Madela and Ubuntu

Nelson Mandela talks on the meaning of Ubuntu.

Many people, companies and government agencies talk about Ubuntu. Not as many as speak, actually practice it.

For training on Ubuntu email us, and visit our website for more information.

Monday, February 27, 2012

Feedback from a recent successful team conflict resolution program

 Celebrating Humanity Team conflict resolution programs remove conflict from teams, through celebration, agreements, clearing and individual accountability.

Here is some feedback from a recent client:-

From a Sales Managers point of view on the training program Celebrating Humanity I found that as a head of department in the Sales division it was certainly beneficial to my whole team. 

I have noticed that their attitude towards one another and to their work has improved remarkably. There is a sense of urgency, motivation and commitment to evaluate a situation before making a decision on certain aspects of their job functions.

The Teambuilding: This was interesting and informative and gave me a different view on my staff I thought that I knew them all regarding their habits and what they did in their everyday activities both at work and on the home front “was I surprised” each individual had similar concerns which was not too much of a issue but had not been voiced in as much detail .This is where the trust and transparency filtered through even more that ever. 

I am perceived as an honest and trustworthy member in my department and this was nice to know that we collectively were brought closer together in sharing our views as a Team rather than individuals.

Methodologies: The methodologies that were applied in achieving the interaction between on another were how I shall say “INTERESTING”. It reminds me of the old saying Back To Basics how true this is, a simple good morning how are you, and how your weekend was is a great opener in any conversation followed with a Smile. 

For one to have the courage and trust in revealing ones personal problems, concerns, and even thoughts on a particular issue is normally a tedious extracting process, not the case when face to face as the exercise revealed where we say opposite one another and reveled our thought and concerns one felt almost obliged to spill all.

The perception that I had of some of the staff “in other departments “was misconstrued. I found them to be transparent and almost enthusiastic to tell me everything they possibly could in the short space of time that we had.

Ability to work with different cultures: This is an area that needs lots of work; it’s too easy to assume that people must answer you back in your home language. I need to take the time to learn the ways and cultures of those we interact with on a day to day basis.Just the basics will be a huge stepping stone forward, too often one feels not so much as embarrassed but more “not informed “well enough to attempt a simple SAWUBONA as an example to someone that we see on a day to day basis .We slip into our comfort zone and use our own native language. 

The body language I found interesting and different in each culture that I encountered as well.

Conclusion: Anyone that is willing to change for the better, the company and in the way they approach life in general will be pleasantly surprised of the outcome of this program. It has given me a different prospective on my staff and a better understanding of how they feel. 

The “buy in” from all has been fantastic and in particular an approach on how to “fix “issues is a joint venture between ourselves as “A Team”. The interaction with other department is much more “transparent”. A huge stepping stone in the right direction.

From: Dave Finch                                        Date: 3rd February 2012

Posted by Brian V Moore

Friday, January 27, 2012

Video - Fun ways to resolve team conflict

Another team conflict resolution program by Celebrating Humanity

Friday, September 23, 2011

How knowing your audience can create more sales and opportunities

Brian Moore talks to David Greenberg on how he has built business and relationships, internationally.

Find out how understanding diversity can make YOU more money!

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Talk straight, talk clearly and talk with respect.

As the lift descended the two Zulu ladies made their observations of my well-rounded figure...

"Hawu! We sisi! Uwubonile umkhaba? (Gee Sister have you noticed the stomach.)
"Yebo, ngiwubonile. Yinkinsela yempela - sengathi inemali eningi!" (Yes, I have noticed it. Clearly a wealthy person - I'd imagine he has plenty of money)

All this gossip happened in front of me, as they innocently watched the floor indicator panel. I bided my time and as the two ladies prepared to leave the lift, I spoke to them in Zulu. "Sobuye sibonane bomama." (I will see you ladies around some time.)

"Hawu! Hawu!" They squealed in shock. "We didn’t know that you could speak Zulu!"

The event reminded me of similar events where people use their "superior" use of language to make negative observations of people.

Many years ago I used the services of a UK born dentist. I had an afternoon session with him. I had earlier washed my mouth out at a supermarket rest-room after eating a sandwich for lunch. It was not enough. He peered into my mouth and pronounced to his assistant, "It is a foggy day in Liverpool."

In his English way he had said that I had not brushed my teeth. I was very embarrassed and he lost me as a client and a number of others who I spoke to about the event.

In a recent training course my beautiful Hindu wife and I were subjected to abuse from a small group of England born delegates. In loud and profane tones they proceeded to malign the "Indians" and their "ability to speak the truth". This in the round about and sarcastic manner of certain English people. Very little is said directly.

We are however well travelled and understood perfectly. As facilitators we have to be fair, pleasant and respectful to all of our delegates. Any mention of their meanness would reduce the programme to a series of personal attacks. It took us both a lot of internal and interpersonal talk to get close to our normal warm level of communication.

At an earlier course three of the many Afrikaners, on a Celebrating Humanity© course, walked into the conference venue and made similar attacks on Arthie and the programme itself. This time it was in Afrikaans. They too never believed that we could understand and speak their language. Their embarrassment was very visible as the programme unfolded with both of us speaking English, Zulu and Afrikaans.

Numerous African people from our many language groups speak of the way certain English speaking South Africans "Shaya ‘ma angles." (To speak indirectly and in a round about way.) It is an old English habit to lighten the criticism and talk around a challenge, so as not to hurt feelings. Often the hurt is greater because no-one besides the speaker understands the true message until much later.

Some people find it necessary to joke in sexual manner. Their jokes are often below the belt and cause great embarrassment to their colleagues and friends who do not discuss these matters outside of their bedrooms. Most African and Eastern groups do not appreciate such jokes. Others try to get their laughs by bringing down "groups" of people. By race, by colour, by language, by religion and even by hair colour.

The message here is all about respect.

When we isolate ourselves into our common groups and use our cleverness to "secretly" or "publicly" attack others, we damage our ability to develop good working relationships. When we try not "to hurt others feelings", we often cause more pain than we would have by straight talk and without rancour. When we use our own "language" to communicate our jealousy or meanness towards those who communicate in other languages, we often isolate ourselves. When we joke in a manner that is sexual or which brings down other people, we bring ourselves, the listeners and our country down.

We live in a wonderful multi-lingual, multi-cultural and multi-spiritual land. All of our people have a right to respect and dignity. All of us have a duty to be respectful and dignified. One huge step of our journey, to a united land, will take place when begin to tell funny jokes that do not demean, or disrespect other people. And another gigantic step will take place when we talk straight, talk clearly and talk with respect.

Celebrating Humanity International
24 April 2004

Thursday, July 7, 2011

Team Conflict Resolution Options

The well-known Celebrating Humanity Team Conflict Resolution program has been designed to accommodate teams that are pressed for time and large organisations.

The Harvest program, with an initial 2.5 to 3 days session,  gives participants extra time to develop leadership, solutions to challenges and advanced communications skills. 

The Mini Harvest program, with an initial 1.5 to 2 day session, is tightly adjusted to build the team in as short a time possible. 

Both programs have the Values Circle Process to clear the past, get commitment and a peer-developed code of conduct - to guide the team into the future.

The follow-up processes and programs ensure long lasting and powerfully inclusive change.

Check out our website for more information. Or email Brian V Moore

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Check out our new blog on "How we Teach and Learn..."

Learning Styles, Communication Styles and Relationships
How your learning style affects your relationships and how you can get better results, yourself and with others.
Now that we know that we have a unique learning style, it is important to note that - as a result of that style - we also have unique ways of interacting, communicating, listening and behaving.

This impacts our relationships and our ability to build relationships with others. This impacts teams. companies and individuals.

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Celebrating Humanity - Team Conflict Resolution©

Celebrating Humanity - Team Conflict Resolution©
24 May 2011 - Brian V Moore

Celebrating Humanity International has over 20 years experience in diversity training, team building and team conflict resolution.

“Put people together in a way that will have them bouncing ideas off each other, befriending each other, and taking care of each other, and suddenly they are coming to you, not with gripes and problems, but with solutions and great ideas.”
- Richard Branson, in his book, Business Stripped Bare

The focus of this enjoyable, inclusive, participative, non-threatening and effective team unity building© programme is to develop professionalism, trust, motivation, understanding, communication, relationships, unity, accountability and respect within your client’s team.

From challenges - to unified and professional teams

The programme is a combination of diversity management, team building, leadership development, relationship building, communication skills development - ending with a solid long-term team agreement which guides the team to work together into the future. After the intervention all team members start afresh - with a clean slate - clear of all past challenges.

This is not a talk, a negotiation – or a traditional team building - this fun and exciting programme is an interactive, transformational and sustainable experience with wonderful lessons learnt and skills developed!

The Celebrating Humanity Mini Harvest© programme has 3 separate stages, with support and follow-up, to ensure long term success.
Team Conflict Resolution Process

Stage 1 - Initial 2 day programme.

EYE Opener Day 1

Designed to Celebrate the Humanity within your team and develop skills in an Exhilarating Learning© environment and thereby:
Create an environment of respect in the team.
Develop an understanding of communication styles and personalities and how to communicate with respect and effectiveness.
Develop an understanding of team members.
Develop interpersonal communication and respect
Create an environment of communication, solution-finding and praise.
Develop understanding of attitudes and their effect on relationships
Bring the team closer together as colleagues.

Values Circle - Day 2
Develops understanding of how the team should and should not behave and puts the team in charge of its own actions and behaviours.
1.The team creates and commits to a formalised peer-managed Code of Conduct, thereafter all team members clear past interpersonal challenges and commit to the team, and to manage their own actions.
The code of conduct ensures that all team members are committed to work together in a respectful way and commits the team to very brief monthly meetings to:
a.Praise and Honour those who deserve it.
b.Develop understanding
c.Give guidance to values breakers
d.Offer support to those with challenges and send those who will not be guided by the team and who break the agreed rules, for the normal company discipline processes.

Monthly meetings and follow-up +- 1 month after the initial programme.

Sets up the team to maintain the programme, through 1 hour 6 weekly meetings. The first meeting, 2 - 4 hours, is facilitated by a CHI lead facilitator, on site.

The team will receive:-
1.A fully explanatory copy of the Code of Conduct.
2.A copy of their signed commitment to the team.
3.An agenda for the management of the ongoing monthly meetings.
4.Photographs on CD or DVD.
5.Free access to telephonic or e-mail support.

Exhilarating Learning Methodologies

Exhilarating Learning© is non-threatening, effective, fun, lasting and unifying.
Exhilarating Learning© activates all of the human learning senses through group & team-focussed processes and exercises.
Learning is ensured through Inclusivity and the use of Intellectual, Visual, Audio & Kinesthetic sensors.
Inclusivity and Teamwork is ensured through Team reliance on each individuals’ Unique Talents, Skills and  Knowledge.
Knowledge and Understanding is developed though the Inclusivity processes.
Teamwork is developed through Group Achievement and the need for Total Participation of all delegates.
Mutual Respect is ensured through the Competition Points System.
Communication Awareness and Skills are developed practically.
Open Minds and Total Participation are ensured through the unique environment and processes.
Long-term Understanding is developed through introspection and the questioning environment.
Tools include the use of various languages, story-telling, music, video & competition.


"On behalf of Team US, from the U.S. Consulate General in Durban, I write to extend our appreciation for and unparalleled experience in cultural sensitisation and team-building!
The 2 day session made our diverse team stronger and more supportive of one another.  This (team building) was by far the most meaningful and effective in fostering good communication, mutual respect and a strong spirit of co operation amongst our multi-cultural staff. "
Jill Derderian - United States Consul General - Durban

"There were times when attitudes were so hard and fast that I thought it would be an impossible task to create teams within groups of people that we were working with but Brian and Arthie with incredible insight and genuine humanity were able to find the chink in the armour and break down barriers that had been built and protected for decades.
From those tenuous and fragile beginnings, many teams soared to great heights achieving outstanding results. I am forever indebted to their excellent work.”
- Sue Hall & Associates

Celebrating Humanity International
Diversity Management, Team Building and Team Conflict Resolution Specialists

079 643 4457/ 072 439 4220/